What are the seven horns and seven eyes?

But there’s still more in this tapestry of Jesus. The Lamb, you notice, has “seven horns and . . . seven eyes, which are the seven spirits of God sent out into all the earth.”27

These words, read in a group study, can be just like red meat to a lion! Many a home Bible study is derailed when you come to a little sentence like this—“seven horns and seven eyes,” and so on. And before you know it, Mrs. Jenkins immediately wants to tell everyone all about the seven horns—and suddenly the big picture of who Jesus is disappears in a discussion of Russia, or China, or the European Economic Community. This is the point at which the firm and wise leader asks Mrs. Jenkins to go make the tea and coffee! She should never have bought that big book that gave so much detailed explanation of how contemporary world history is minutely described in Revelation but said so little about the sheer glory of the Lord Jesus! It can be all very fascinating and wonderful, like sudoku, or math. But it can take you deep into the night.

No, God is much simpler than all that. The horns speak of power and majesty; the eyes remind us that Christ has sent his Holy Spirit into the world, with all of his omniscience, perfect understanding, and wonderful discernment. And the fact that there are seven horns, eyes, and spirits simply expresses numerically the idea of fullness and perfection.

It would be a great pity to have been shown this vivid picture of the Father seated on the throne, the Son in all his redeeming grace and glory, and the Holy Spirit in all the fullness of his saving ministry but see only horns, eyes, and numbers! That would be to obscure what is plain and clear and to marginalize what is central.

Actually, there is a litmus test for interpretation written into the text here. It is this: what effect does this vision have on me? Perplexity? Debate? Calculation? All wrong responses. For the response of heaven is this:

The four creatures and the twenty four elders fell down before the Lamb, each holding a harp, and golden bowls full of incense, which are the prayers of the saints. And they sang a new song, saying,

“Worthy are you to take the scroll
and to open its seals,
for you were slain, and by your blood you ransomed people for God
from every tribe and language and people and nation.”

Alistair Begg and Sinclair B. Ferguson, Name above All Names (Wheaton, IL: Crossway, 2013).


The book and study guide are both available on Amazon. The study guide is also available as well as part of my Good Questions Have Groups Talking subscription service.

This service is like Netflix for Bible Lessons. You pay a low monthly, quarterly or annual fee and get access to all the lessons. New lessons that correspond with three of Lifeway’s outlines are automatically included, as well as a backlog of thousands of lessons. Each lesson consists of 20 or so ready-to-use questions that get groups talking, as well as answers from well-known authors such as David Jeremiah, Charles Swindoll and Max Lucado. For more information, or to sign up, click here.

That it may go well with you

The promise that God is good is repeated many times in Scripture. It is a repeated theme through the whole Bible. Here are a few examples:

“Honor your father and your mother, as the LORD your God has commanded you, so that you may live long and that it may go well with you in the land the LORD your God is giving you. Deuteronomy 5:16 (NIV2011)

Oh, that their hearts would be inclined to fear me and keep all my commands always, so that it might go well with them and their children forever! Deuteronomy 5:29 (NIV2011)

Hear, Israel, and be careful to obey so that it may go well with you and that you may increase greatly in a land flowing with milk and honey, just as the LORD, the God of your ancestors, promised you. Deuteronomy 6:3 (NIV2011)

He gave you manna to eat in the wilderness, something your ancestors had never known, to humble and test you so that in the end it might go well with you. Deuteronomy 8:16 (NIV2011)

Yet because the wicked do not fear God, it will not go well with them, and their days will not lengthen like a shadow. Ecclesiastes 8:13 (NIV2011)

Do you believe—really believe—that if you give part of your money away that it will go well with you? If not, the solution is not to try really hard to be generous. You must change your beliefs. You must be transformed by the renewing of your mind.

Do you believe—really believe—that there is a throne in Heaven and Someone is sitting on it. (Revelation 4:2). Or, do you believe the world is running amuck. If you really believe the latter, trying really hard not to worry won’t help.

The book and study guide are both available on Amazon. The study guide is also avail as well as part of my Good Questions Have Groups Talking subscription service. This service is like Netflix for Bible Lessons. You pay a low monthly, quarterly or annual fee and get access to all the lessons. New lessons that correspond with three of Lifeway’s outlines are automatically included, as well as a backlog of thousands of lessons. Each lesson consists of 20 or so ready-to-use questions that get groups talking, as well as answers from well-known authors such as David Jeremiah, Charles Swindoll and Max Lucado. For more information, or to sign up, click here.

Belief or belief?

You might think that you believe exercise is good, but you don’t exercise and you should have a Quiet Time, but you didn’t this morning. Let’s look at two ways we use this word belief.

I had a long layover in Auckland, New Zealand once. Someone had told me about the Sky Tower. At over 1000 feet, it is the tallest tower in the southern hemisphere. It is roughly the height of the Empire State Building.

But, the Sky Tower has a twist. They will let you jump off.

They call it SkyJump. They attach you to a wire that will allow you to free-fall from the Sky Tower for about half its height. Then, the contraption slowly brings you to the ground at a safe speed. It is an adrenaline rush just watching the videos. (Do a search for “sky jump Auckland.”) You really need to watch the video to grasp what I am getting at.

I believe this contraption is safe. They have an impeccable safety record. No one has ever been killed or even injured on the SkyJump. From their webpage:

Safety is one thing you don’t have to worry about! SkyJump is OSH approved and very rigorous safety standards are upheld. Our Jump Masters undergo intensive training and always operate in teams, checking each other’s work as they go. SkyJump is an adventure activity with a very low real risk but very high perceived risk, so as the saying goes – it’s mind over matter!

I believe the SkyJump is safe. I believe if a million people jumped off, a million people would land safely. I believe the cables are strong. I believe the workers are well-trained. I believe the system is checked and re-checked. I believe they have a strong incentive beyond morality to avoid an accident. One accident could ruin their business for good. I believe the SkyJump is safe.

So, I went to the SkyJump. I paid my money. (I think it was around $100.) I took the elevator to the top. They strapped me in. They attached the cable. They told me to jump.

I couldn’t jump.

Did I believe? On one level, I did. I really did. I still do. I just didn’t believe enough to take that last step. This is the difference between believing and believing.

Lots of people believe that God is good in the way that I believe the SkyJump is safe. They believe in theory. They don’t believe enough to take that last step. They don’t believe enough to trust their life to God.

Do you know who really, really believes the SkyJump is safe? It is not the engineers that designed it. They have only head knowledge. It is not the safety inspectors who certify its safety. Their belief is eighteen inches too high—it is in their head, not their heart. It is not the owners of the SkyJump. The people who really, really, really believe it is safe are the teenagers who work up there every day. I have looked into their eyes. They have no doubt that it is safe. Experience has changed them. They have worked with the SkyJump so long they have come to believe—really believe in their gut—the SkyJump is safe.


The book and study guide are both available on Amazon. The study guide is also avail as well as part of my Good Questions Have Groups Talking subscription service.

This service is like Netflix for Bible Lessons. You pay a low monthly, quarterly or annual fee and get access to all the lessons. New lessons that correspond with three of Lifeway’s outlines are automatically included, as well as a backlog of thousands of lessons. Each lesson consists of 20 or so ready-to-use questions that get groups talking, as well as answers from well-known authors such as David Jeremiah, Charles Swindoll and Max Lucado. For more information, or to sign up, click here.

Jesus: Fully and Truly Human

The story of the church’s understanding of the person of Jesus Christ is one of swings and roundabouts. The pendulum swings between diminishing the divinity of Jesus and diminishing his humanity. In the last 150 years, liberalism has diminished Christ’s divinity, and orthodoxy, partly in reaction, has run the risk of diminishing his humanity. In our insistence that Jesus is Lord, that he is the divine King—which we unreservedly affirm—we must never fall into the error of having a less than human, or more than human, Christ. If we do, we reduce his saving work to a mathematical formula, and, worse, we have a Christ who is not able to be a savior.

But if our Savior is truly and fully human, then his work is a flesh-and-blood reality. He is a real man in this real garden among real friends who fail him just when he is facing this real onslaught. On the one hand, that onslaught comes from hell (was there ever fiercer temptation than now?). “Turn away from obedience to death, even death on a cross.” On the other hand the cup he shrinks from drinking contains an onslaught from heaven.43 It will bring him eventually to the point of crying out, “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?”

Jesus knows this is what it will mean if he is to suffer and die as an atoning sacrifice for sin. He is about to taste God-forsakenness.

Alistair Begg and Sinclair B. Ferguson, Name above All Names (Wheaton, IL: Crossway, 2013).


The book and study guide are both available on Amazon. The study guide is also available as well as part of my Good Questions Have Groups Talking subscription service.

This service is like Netflix for Bible Lessons. You pay a low monthly, quarterly or annual fee and get access to all the lessons. New lessons that correspond with three of Lifeway’s outlines are automatically included, as well as a backlog of thousands of lessons. Each lesson consists of 20 or so ready-to-use questions that get groups talking, as well as answers from well-known authors such as David Jeremiah, Charles Swindoll and Max Lucado. For more information, or to sign up, click here.

Transformed by better thinking

There is a common misperception—inside and outside the church—that Christian living is fundamentally about trying really hard to be good. It is not. It is about being transformed. This has a lot to do with changing the way we think:

Do not conform to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind. Then you will be able to test and approve what God’s will is—his good, pleasing and perfect will. Romans 12:2 (NIV2011)

This word translated transformed is metamorphóō. We get our word metamorphosis from this word, and it is beautifully illustrated by what happens to a butterfly when it is transformed from an egg to a caterpillar to a chrysalis to a butterfly. A butterfly is not a caterpillar that is trying really hard to fly. Caterpillars can’t try really hard to fly. They have to be transformed. We can’t live the Christian life by trying really hard, although, trying really hard has its place. Some Christians don’t try hard enough. We will get into that later. In this chapter we want to explore how God changes our thinking.

God is good

The fundamental change that God wants to do in our thinking revolves around the nature of God Himself. Tozer prods us at this point:

What comes into our minds when we think about God is the most important thing about us… Worship is pure or base as the worshiper entertains high or low thoughts of God. For this reason the gravest question before the Church is always God Himself, and the most portentous fact about any man is not what he at a given time may say or do, but what he in his deep heart conceives God to be like.

We must come to believe this central phrase: God is good.

  • Taste and see that the LORD is good; blessed is the one who takes refuge in him. Psalm 34:8 (NIV2011)
  • For the Lord is good and his love endures forever; his faithfulness continues through all generations. Psalm 100:5 (NIV2011)
  • You are good, and what you do is good; teach me your decrees. Psalm 119:68 (NIV2011)
  • Praise the LORD, for the LORD is good; sing praise to his name, for that is pleasant. Psalm 135:3 (NIV2011)
  • The LORD is good to all; he has compassion on all he has made. Psalm 145:9 (NIV2011) [Emphasis added.]

The reason unbelievers don’t want to come to God is because they don’t believe God is good. They don’t believe it would be good for them to follow God. They don’t believe it is in their best interest to live the Christian life.

The reason believers struggle with the demands of discipleship is the same. They don’t believe—really believe—God is good. They don’t believe—really believe—it would be good for them to follow God. They don’t believe—really believe—it is in their best interest to fully and whole-heartedly live the Christian life.

We are irrevocably hard-wired to do what we believe to be in our best interest. We will always do—in the long run—what we believe is best for us. People who believe that exercise is good for them exercise. People who believe that eating healthfully is best eat healthfully. People who believe that it is best to memorize scripture do so. We must come to love the Christian life, or we will never come to live the Christian life.

Tozer, A.W.. The Knowledge of the Holy (p. 1). Fig. Kindle Edition.


The book and study guide are both available on Amazon. The study guide is also avail as well as part of my Good Questions Have Groups Talking subscription service.

This service is like Netflix for Bible Lessons. You pay a low monthly, quarterly or annual fee and get access to all the lessons. New lessons that correspond with three of Lifeway’s outlines are automatically included, as well as a backlog of thousands of lessons. Each lesson consists of 20 or so ready-to-use questions that get groups talking, as well as answers from well-known authors such as David Jeremiah, Charles Swindoll and Max Lucado. For more information, or to sign up, click here.

Training, not trying

I fell on the hard court playing tennis recently. I was able to walk off the court, drive home, and walk into the house—although ever-so-gingerly. After about an hour of watching TV I tried to move. Notice I said tried. I couldn’t.

I don’t know how painful it is to have a baby, but I have never imagined it would be any more painful than the pain I experienced that night. Every subtle shift in the chair sent me screaming in pain. After a few hours of this, my wife called 911 and the ambulance arrived a few minutes later. Getting onto the board to get me off the couch was excruciating. The ride was worse. Every turn, every bump… why don’t they put better shocks in an ambulance?

After settling into my bed at the emergency room I had a moment of reprieve. (It only really hurt when I moved.) I had a moment where I thought, “It doesn’t hurt right now. This feels good.” That thought was followed with, “This bed is just about right. Not too firm. Not too soft. And it is tilted just about right. This feels pretty good. Thank you, Lord, for this bed. And, thank you for a hospital not too far from my house. Thank you for an ambulance to transport me. Thank you for a wife to hold my hand during this ordeal. Thank you for the doctors and the hope of some relief. Thank you for insurance that will pay for most of this.”

On and on my mind with this little riff, thanking God for one thing after another. Once my mind cued up the gratitude tape, it just played and played. I didn’t enjoy this little thanksgiving service in the privacy of my mind because I am a super-godly person. I enjoyed that little thanksgiving service because I had trained myself to be grateful. Night after night I thought of twenty things I was grateful for so that when the trigger of thanking God for one thing—the hospital bed—was pulled, I could not keep myself from going through that whole riff.

Many people think the command to “Give thanks in all circumstances” is wishful thinking. Part of them feels guilty for not living up to it. Part of them feels the command is impossible. People who have trained themselves don’t feel that way. They know the joy of living with a mind that is constantly thinking of all the things they are grateful for. Train yourself to be godly.

If you will train yourself to be grateful—rather than merely trying really hard to be grateful, you will have far more dog days, and far fewer cat days.

Imagine you hear a sermon on service. Don’t try hard to serve. Train yourself to be godly. Train yourself to serve. I pick up trash when I walk every day. I think it is good for my soul. My wife and I both use Kindles, but for whatever reason, we only have one charger. I charge her Kindle first. I think it is good for my soul.


The book and study guide are both available on Amazon. The study guide is also avail as well as part of my Good Questions Have Groups Talking subscription service.

This service is like Netflix for Bible Lessons. You pay a low monthly, quarterly or annual fee and get access to all the lessons. New lessons that correspond with three of Lifeway’s outlines are automatically included, as well as a backlog of thousands of lessons. Each lesson consists of 20 or so ready-to-use questions that get groups talking, as well as answers from well-known authors such as David Jeremiah, Charles Swindoll and Max Lucado. For more information, or to sign up, click here.

Train yourself to be grateful

Let’s go back to the sermon you heard on gratitude. Instead of trying really hard to be grateful, train yourself to be grateful. Get a simple, blank, 100-page notebook. Commit to writing down three things you are grateful for every night before you go to bed. Do this for 100 days. By this time, you will have formed a habit. You will not be able to keep from thinking of three things you are grateful for before you go to bed. In fact you will think of things you are grateful for all the time. Gratitude will become a habit. It will become your automatic thought-language. Gratitude will become easy.

Many people have a thought language that some have called ANTs: Automatic Negative Thoughts. “I am just so clumsy. This always happens to me. Just my luck.” Squash the ANTs with gratitude. Research shows that all of life will be better when you squash the ANTs with gratitude:

Spend just a few minutes each day focusing on the good things that happened, the incidents and situations that you’d put in the plus column if you were noting plusses and minuses. You’ll be healthier. You’ll sleep better and exercise more. You’ll feel more optimistic. Take just a moment to note the day’s blessings and you’ll sense that you have more energy. You will feel more alert and active. Do this for a period of time, and you’ll realize you are making progress toward your goals in life. You may even discover you’re less of a mess, more organized, less possessive-the clutter that used to collect around you seems to disappear.

I have experienced this. My approach is this. I often think of twenty things I am grateful for before I go to bed at night. (Writing would be better. I compensate for this by thinking of twenty things instead of three.) I think of them in four categories:

  • Family members I am grateful for. Wife, kids, grandkids, parents…
  • Other people I am grateful for. Friends. Church people. The mail man.
  • Physical things I am grateful for. Air conditioning. Indoor plumbing. The Internet.
  • Spiritual things I am grateful for. The Bible. The forgiveness of sins. Spiritual gifts. The hope of eternal life.

I have done this for several years. I don’t do it every night, but I have done it enough times that it is a habit. It has shaped my thinking. The first thoughts that come through my mind in the morning are thoughts of gratitude. I put my feet on a little green rug we have in front of the sink. I think about how warm and snugly that rug feels on my feet. Thank God for a little green rug.

Thank God for air-conditioning. Thank God for godly parents. Thank God for grand-kids. Thank God for apples. I love apples. Thank God for my job writing Bible Study Lessons. Thank God. Thank God. Thank God. Gratitude is easy. I have trained myself to be grateful.

Thank You Power: Making the Science of Gratitude Work for You by Deborah Norville


The book and study guide are both available on Amazon. The study guide is also avail as well as part of my Good Questions Have Groups Talking subscription service.

This service is like Netflix for Bible Lessons. You pay a low monthly, quarterly or annual fee and get access to all the lessons. New lessons that correspond with three of Lifeway’s outlines are automatically included, as well as a backlog of thousands of lessons. Each lesson consists of 20 or so ready-to-use questions that get groups talking, as well as answers from well-known authors such as David Jeremiah, Charles Swindoll and Max Lucado. For more information, or to sign up, click here.

How was King Jesus different from any other king?

Jesus mounts a donkey and rides into Jerusalem surrounded by this huge, noisy crowd. We do not have any other record of Jesus riding anywhere, do we? This is the only place it happens.

It isn’t because Jesus is tired that he is riding on the donkey. He had deliberately sent his disciples into the city to get it on this particular day.23 He wanted to make a point.

But what point?

Jesus is here confronting the community by his actions. He is deliberately entering the jurisdictions of Annas and Caiphas the Jewish high priests, and of the Jewish ruling council (the Sanhedrin), and of Pontius Pilate the governor who represented all the might of the Roman Empire. Later, Pilate will ask him, “Who in the world are you?” At one point he will ask directly, “Are you then the King of the Jews? Let’s just get this sorted out, Jesus. Are you the King of the Jews?” And Jesus replies, “You have said so.”24

But what kind of king is he? What kind of king rides on a donkey? What kind of king wears a crown that is woven with thorns? What kind of king is dressed up in someone else’s robe and made to look foolish and a figure of fun and is cruelly mocked by his ill-disciplined military custodians?25 Here we see the great paradox that confronts any intelligent reader of the Bible.

It is also the paradox that threw off many of the people who were looking for the coming one. They cried, “Save us, we pray, O LORD! O LORD, we pray, give us success!”26 But then they witnessed a whole series of scenes in which Jesus was “despised and rejected . . . a man of sorrows . . . acquainted with grief.”27 What possibility was there that he could bring salvation, safety, and success when he could not apparently secure his own safety? His ministry had led him to such an ignominious end.

Alistair Begg and Sinclair B. Ferguson, Name above All Names (Wheaton, IL: Crossway, 2013).


The book and study guide are both available on Amazon. The study guide is also available as well as part of my Good Questions Have Groups Talking subscription service.

This service is like Netflix for Bible Lessons. You pay a low monthly, quarterly or annual fee and get access to all the lessons. New lessons that correspond with three of Lifeway’s outlines are automatically included, as well as a backlog of thousands of lessons. Each lesson consists of 20 or so ready-to-use questions that get groups talking, as well as answers from well-known authors such as David Jeremiah, Charles Swindoll and Max Lucado. For more information, or to sign up, click here.

Train yourself to be godly

Imagine you can’t play the piano and I asked you to play Amazing Grace. Would it be easy or hard? Would it help if you tried really, really hard to play Amazing Grace?

This is how many people try to live the Christian life. They hear a sermon on gratefulness. They try really hard to be grateful. They do this for a few hours or a few days. Then, they forget about it. Life gets in the way. Then, they are left with a nagging feeling of guilt about how they are not as grateful as they would like to be.

Next week they hear a sermon on service. They try really hard to serve… for a few hours. Then they forget about it. Again, they have a life. They don’t rebel against God or the idea of serving, they just forget about it and go on with life. But again, they are left with a nagging sense of guilt about not serving as they ought.

The next week they hear a sermon on prayer. Same thing.

There is a better way. (I owe my insight into this verse to John Ortberg. I think he got it from Dallas Willard.) Here is the key verse:

Train yourself to be godly. 1 Timothy 4:7 (NIV2011)

Let’s go back to the piano. Instead of trying really hard to play Amazing Grace, what if you trained yourself to play Amazing Grace? What would that look like?

Let’s imagine you sit down with a skilled piano teacher. He explains that your fingers can be numbered one through five. The thumb is one and the pinky is five. The middle finger is three.

He places your middle finger on the E above middle C. He asks you to play 3-2-1 starting with E above middle C with the middle finger of your right hand. These are the first three notes of “Mary had a little lamb.” He walks you through the rest of the song, pointing to the notes on the music in front of you. After about ten times, you stumble through it.

He gives you ten more songs, and works you through each one until you are able to figure out how it works. He asks you to practice for an hour a day and you agree to do so. A week later, you can play the melody of all ten songs reasonably well. You are only playing one note at a time at this point.

He gives you ten more songs. You practice those for a few weeks. He introduces the left hand. At first, you play only the left hand. Then, you play both hands together. Then you play two notes at the same time in the right hand. This is called harmony. You practice some more. Practice, practice, practice. This is training to play the piano.

Keep this up for about five years and you will easily be able to play Amazing Grace. It won’t be hard; it will be easy.

You might object that this way sounds like a hard way to learn to play Amazing Grace. It is not the hard way, it is the only way. The hard way is trying really hard to play Amazing Grace. Here is the good news. Once you subject yourself to this training, playing Amazing Grace will be easy. In fact, nearly any song in the hymnbook will be easy. Ask anyone who can play Amazing Grace. They will tell you it is easy. What is hard is trying to do something you have not trained yourself to do.

Train yourself to be godly.


The book and study guide are both available on Amazon. The study guide is also avail as well as part of my Good Questions Have Groups Talking subscription service.

This service is like Netflix for Bible Lessons. You pay a low monthly, quarterly or annual fee and get access to all the lessons. New lessons that correspond with three of Lifeway’s outlines are automatically included, as well as a backlog of thousands of lessons. Each lesson consists of 20 or so ready-to-use questions that get groups talking, as well as answers from well-known authors such as David Jeremiah, Charles Swindoll and Max Lucado. For more information, or to sign up, click here.

Nothing Left to Fear

Would that every psychiatrist, every therapist, every personal counselor in the country understood that sin, guilt, the wrath of God, and therefore the fear of death create all other fears and lurk underneath all manner of neuroses. Until this central fear is dealt with, these other fears must linger on. Why is that? Because only when we are delivered from the great fear—the fear of death and judgment—will other fears become trivial. They can be dissolved only by the knowledge that I need not fear death because the guilt of my sin has been borne by my Savior.

We have another friend in Scotland, a distinguished professor of mathematics. A number of years ago, one of his daughters, a young freshman Christian student, died suddenly. One moment from the day of her funeral has etched itself permanently into our memory. Our friend was borne along through the day by the grace of God. His quiet words as we greeted him were: “We know now that we have nothing left to fear.”

That’s it—nothing left to fear.

All this is true only because Jesus has dealt with our greatest problem.

That problem is not simply that of our fear. Our greatest problem is God himself. For by nature, we are under his wrath—and deserve to be. If we cannot deal with our sin and guilt, we certainly cannot deal with the wrath of God. But it was precisely to bear that wrath that the Lord Jesus, as our high priest, went into the holy place, the very presence of the holy God, and there experienced the awful unleashing of divine judgment.

This is why, when the resurrected Jesus revealed himself to his disciples, his first word was “Shalom! Peace! Now at last you may have peace with God.”25

This is Christ’s finished work as priest.

Most Christians are familiar with the finished work of Christ but less so with his unfinished work. But the author of Hebrews helps us to understand that although Jesus is “seated at the right hand of God,” having finished his atoning work, he is still doing something. He now undertakes his unfinished work.

Alistair Begg and Sinclair B. Ferguson, Name above All Names (Wheaton, IL: Crossway, 2013).


The book and study guide are both available on Amazon. The study guide is also available as well as part of my Good Questions Have Groups Talking subscription service.

This service is like Netflix for Bible Lessons. You pay a low monthly, quarterly or annual fee and get access to all the lessons. New lessons that correspond with three of Lifeway’s outlines are automatically included, as well as a backlog of thousands of lessons. Each lesson consists of 20 or so ready-to-use questions that get groups talking, as well as answers from well-known authors such as David Jeremiah, Charles Swindoll and Max Lucado. For more information, or to sign up, click here.

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